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Basic Blueberry Wine Recipe

Ingredients for one gallon of wine:

  • 2 1/2 pounds of blueberries (fresh or frozen) Use more for a heavier body
    wine.

  • 4 1/2 cups of sugar
  • 1 teaspoon Yeast Nutrient
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons acid blend
  • 1 teaspoon pectic enzyme
  • 1 Campden tablet.
  • Wine making yeast

Directions

Crush the blueberries. I like to use a brand new pair of nylon stockings for
this, cut to size, and tied off. Frozen blueberries are great to use, after
they have thawed. The process of freezing the blueberries causes the skin of
the berry to be “pierced.”

Mix the sugar well into two litres of hot or warm water, until the sugar has
disolved.

Put nylon containing crushed berries into primary fermenter.

Pour sugar water into primary fermenter.

Add water to the one gallon mark on the primary fermenter.

Add the yeast nutrient, acid blend, and pectic enzyme. Stir well.

Crush the campden tablet, add to the muss, and stir well.

Take a specific gravity reading – it should be between 1.095 and 1.110 for a dry wine with an alcohol content between approximately 12 and 14%. Add
sugar if necessary to increase specific gravity.

Ensure the temperature of the must is between 70 and 85 F. Then sprinkle the
yeast on top.

Put a lid on the primary fermenter. Check the next day to ensure yeast has
started working. Press down lid if using tight fitting primary fermentation
lid and pail to expel the gasses. Do this 3 or 4 times per day for 7 days.

Check specific gravity, and when it is less than 0.090, rack into secondary
fermenter (1 gallon carboy). Top up with water if required, and apply an air
lock.

In three months, rack the wine into another carboy. This helps to remove the
sediment and ensures no “yeast rot.” Add another crushed Campden tablet, and
apply air lock.

Age an additional three months (or longer if you want), and then bottle.

For five Imperial gallons, multiply the above ingredients by five – but it’s
recommended that if this is your first time, just make one gallon. You don’t
want to end up with gallons of stuff you don’t like!

This recipe is based upon one in the book, Enjoy Home Winemaking by Robert and Eileen Frishman, now out of print.

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